Humanity is the Beast

 

Netflix Delivers Film Targeting Year-end Awards 

by Noel T. Manning II

When the world around you falls apart, and the life you know and love is ripped from underneath your feet, how do you survive? You either find a way to adapt, surrender, fight, or die. That is the story we find unfolding in Netflix’s “Beasts of No Nation.”

“Nothing is ever for sure and everything is always changing.”

 

beasts-of-no-nation-1140x641Caught between warring factions in an African Civil War, a young orphan teen, Agu, reluctantly joins forces with a rebellion leader and discovers a different type of family. Agu finds a world where violence, suffering, anger, and the thirst for power provide the main courses for each day. He finds that leadership and authority is never guaranteed, even for those who assume the power.

This film is a painful journey into the darkness of the soul, and one in which making one wrong choice can send you to a point of no return. It is a film filled with life questions, and challenges the viewer to examine consequences of actions and inactions.

“I am like old man, not baby, because of my experiences.”

web-beastsCapturing elements of man v man, man v society, and man v self, “Beasts” is a fascinating story exploring lost innocence and the collateral damage associated with trauma through violence. Watching Agu fall deeper and deeper into a life thrust upon him, one wonders, what happens when you become the very evil you hate?

“When you become the Devils pawn, and find yourself doing his bidding, can you ever find redemption… and do you even deserve it?”

e649f612a135cf3f08bbfe300dfea38aAgu also abandons his empathy and compassion along this journey, and yet viewers catch a fading glimpse of it when Agu loses a friend to the violent path he is on. Agu is faced with this: once you’ve travelled so far down a dark and evil road, can you ever find humanity again? Although going back to what you once had is not an option, is there another way forward? Is it even worth the chance?

With an amazing companion score by Dan Romer, the film was well-shot, it offered wonderfully gritty set designs and locations, and provided great performances by newcomer Abraham Attah (Agu) & Idris Elda as the rebel leader. “Beasts” was a powerful story written & directed by Cary Joji Fukunaga and based on the 2005 novel by Nigerian-American author Uzodinma Iweala.

UnknownYet with all that went right with the film, it still had its flaws. It lacked overall balance for me. It had an extremely slow start, intense 2nd act, and an incredibly sluggish 3rd act, and that imbalance combined with the too-long 2 hour and 17 minute runtime detracted from a film that could have been great.  There was also voice over narration that I found disruptive to the story, and it interrupted the flow of the film as a whole. Better editing choices, and 30 minutes shorter, and this could’ve been on my top ten of the year.

commandant-idris-elba-beasts-of-no-nation-assetThe story is still one worth telling, and the film is worth watching. If “Beasts” is any indication, the potential of the Netflix movie studio machine looks promising. While I have no plans to nominate this film this year, I do look forward for what else the studio has in mind for the future.

Cinemascene Score Card = C+

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